Linux Timeshock v1.1.3

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Linux Timeshock v1.1.3

Postby FIL » Fri Jul 01, 2016 1:44 pm

I was very excited to see a Linux version appear at last! (A little disappointed when it required a log-in, but as the game is still under development I can cope with that. I look forward to the promised DRM-free version when the game is finished, however.)

In any case I'm thrilled to be playing a Linux-native Timeshock! It's looking really great!!

(My usual viewing perspective is still on the "coming soon" list, unfortunately for me; but I know you'll get there in the end, so it's all good.)

I had some performance issues in my initial games. As I'm certain you'll appreciate, even the most minor visual jerkiness in the ball movement is a problem in a pinball game, and the movement, while usually good, wasn't always completely smooth to my eye. I then had one extended period of MAJOR jerkiness (almost certainly under 10fps) where something had clearly gone quite wrong. Hopefully you're already aware of such instances, and will be able to track down the cause(s). A super-smooth simulation really is of paramount import, and my mind would be boggled if my Core i5 CPU wasn't up to the task.

I've dropped the graphical quality to minimum, so I'll see in due course whether that seems to help consistently.

I'd like to know whether "glass off" could also help performance? I imagine it could do, but the game annoyingly doesn't seem to remember the setting. I wish I could set that permanently (I'm not sufficiently fixated on visual reality to consider reflections in the glass to be a feature I need, although I do still appreciate that (a) it's there for people who want it, and (b) it can be disabled at all.)

Anyways, congratulations on this milestone release! I'm so happy to finally be playing this, and I look forward to the future updates.
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Re: Linux Timeshock v1.1.3

Postby Ehvis » Fri Jul 01, 2016 10:17 pm

The log-in isn't needed. You can play just fine in guest mode. Also glass off is not a setting, it's a "cheat" mode. Actually, it's pretty useful to learn the table.

No performance issues for me. But I think I'm somewhat overpowered for this game.
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Re: Linux Timeshock v1.1.3

Postby FIL » Sat Jul 02, 2016 6:53 am

As an experiment I tried setting graphical detail to maximum, and got a consistently awful frame rate, so that's absolutely a factor on my PC.

With graphics on minimum it's been smooth sailing thus far (and the table still looks fabulous).

My monitor's native vertical resolution is 1080 so I've been using that, but I've now also experimented with the minimum 768 resolution...

At 768 with other graphical detail at maximum, I get a mostly smooth frame rate, but with several moments of stuttering. So with details on maximum, the difference between the 768 resolution (mostly smooth) and the 1080 resolution (consistently awful) on my PC is really dramatic!

I'm running on an Intel Core i5 760 @ 2.80GHz, and a GeForce 8600 GTS.

The 768 resolution doesn't look great with the high table view (particularly the LCD which has some pretty glaring aliasing going on), but I'm pretty sure that a table view with an overlay LCD is the only sane choice for that resolution, so that's ok. With the low view, the table really looks very pretty even at this resolution! However...

My only significant complaint about the rendering (even at 1080) is that I'm finding all the lit-up labels on the table very hard to read. It looks as if a tremendous amount of effort has gone into life-like rendering, including all the little bits of dark or glare which might happen for a given bit of plastic at that specific viewing angle -- but all these things just make it hard to read. Especially the track leading up to the crystal -- the text on those is incredibly difficult to see.

On a real pinball table, the player can trivially move their head to see something more clearly. I feel that reduced visibility in the name of rendering fidelity is a mistake. (I also fear that it's WAY too late to do anything about it.) Ironically, the people who put this into a pinball cabinet will still be stuck with the same hard-to-see labels no matter how they move their heads.

It would be fantastic if there was an option for more-readable labels. I compared and contrasted with the original game, and the text is so much clearer in that version.
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Linux Timeshock v1.2.0

Postby FIL » Tue Jul 05, 2016 2:51 pm

FIL wrote:(My usual viewing perspective is still on the "coming soon" list, unfortunately for me; but I know you'll get there in the end, so it's all good.)
Well that was resolved rather more rapidly than I'd expected!!!!

v1.2.0 seems to have ALL the views?! And we can play offline? Waiting for the Linux version had some advantages, clearly :)

And I see I can run it as "ProPinball q" to get right to the table. (I think that may have been in the last release too, but I had been trying to use "-q" instead of just "q", and of course it didn't work.)

Brilliant stuff.
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Re: Linux Timeshock v1.1.3

Postby FIL » Tue Jul 05, 2016 3:09 pm

I managed to completely miss this reply, sorry.

Ehvis wrote:The log-in isn't needed. You can play just fine in guest mode.
No, I actually couldn't play as a guest in 1.1.3. That's now been dealt with in 1.2.0, however.

Also glass off is not a setting, it's a "cheat" mode. Actually, it's pretty useful to learn the table.
Oh, you can move the ball around with the mouse!! Good grief, now I understand why it was being touted as a noteworthy feature. I remember thinking that was extremely weird when I was looking at the Kickstarter campaign.

It would still be nice if we could have a graphical-only "glass off" setting without triggering the cheat mode, however. Given the choice, I think I'd definitely turn off those particular reflections.
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